The intelligence of an African grey can make a demanding pet, however you
must absolutely be prepared to spend a lot of time with an African grey, to  
provide social contact and mental stimulation. Greys need a lot of attention and
patience along with a good deal of guidance to acceptable behavior.

African greys tend to be quite cautious with new situations and new people,
although they are devoted to their owners. They have a reputation as a one-person
bird, but that is largely because often only one person in a household spends
enough time with a grey to really form a close bond.

Make an effort to socialize  your Grey with several different people. As with any
new person, you will have to give your parrot the chance to become comfortable
with them. A Grey will happily interact with more than one person as long as the
effort is made by each person to spend quality time with them to earn their trust
and companionship.

Greys, like other parrots can bite, especially if they feel threatened in any way.
However, the trust of an African grey must be earned through patience and
respect. They are also perceptive to the moods of the people around them, so they
should be approached with a calm and relaxed demeanor or they may become
agitated or excited. Also, a bored or stressed parrot is more likely to exhibit
behavioral problems including biting, so make sure the emotional, mental, and
physical needs of your grey are being met, which will help avoid those problems.

Parrots will sometimes resort to feather picking for a variety of physical and
physiological reasons if their emotional needs are not being met or if they are
stressed. It should be noted that any bird that is plucking its feathers, should
undergo a thorough check up with an avian veterinarian to rule out a physical
cause first.   

Colors: The African Grey, true to it's name, sports mostly grey feathers with some
beautiful thin white edging. Congo African Greys boast shiny black beaks and
bright red tail feathers, while the Timneh Greys have bone colored mandibles and
tail feathers of deep maroon. I own Red Factor Congo Greys.

Feeding: As with most exotic bird species, a meal consisting of fresh vegetables
and tropical fruits, supplemented with a quality diet such as Hagen Tropimix is
best for all birds including African Greys. Many Greys also enjoy a variety of
treats and snacks such as nuts, boiled eggs, and small bits of cheese. Variety is
the key as with our diets, a small amount is okay but nothing in excess. Breads
contain yeast, so again, limit the amount you give your birds.

A small amount of seed can be fed but keep in mind that seeds have minimal
nutritional value and are mostly fattening with a poor balance so do not provide
only seed as the main part of their diet.

Some African Greys are prone to calcium deficiency and those levels should be
monitored yearly. Calcium supplements should not be used except under the
advice of a veterinarian, but it is beneficial to feed a variety of calcium rich
foods such as leafy green vegetables such as kale, mustard greens, Swiss chard,
spinach etc. Fresh water should be available at all times. Food and water dishes
must be washed daily to prevent bacteria. I don't use water bottles because the
greys love to "dunk" their food while they eat just like in the wild.

Exercise: Adequate amounts of exercise is imperative for good health of a captive
African Grey. Greys should be allowed to spend several hours out of their cages
daily and be provided plenty of bird safe chew toys to facilitate exercising their
powerful mandibles.

African Greys as Pets: African Grey parrots have been kept as pets for many years.
Their fascinating ability to reason and their talent to clearly mimmick human
speech has helped catapult them to stardom both in research and in the pet trade.

Captive African Greys typically pick up on words and sounds very quickly,
with owners reporting their bird mimics the sound of telephones, microwaves, and
even other pets vocalizations like dogs and cats. African Greys have a reputation
for repeating what they hear, so teach appropriately like you do with a human
child!

While the African Grey is perhaps one of the most intelligent parrot species, their
high IQ's mean that they require more time and guidance from their owners, over
some of the smaller birds. Properly cared for Greys bond strongly with their
owners and become affectionate, captivating pets.


Thanks for looking and enjoy your pets!
AFRICAN GREY
ARCADE
Common Names:  African Grey Parrot, Congo African Grey, CAG

Origin:  Africa

Size:  Approximately 12 to 13 inches from beak to tail.  The African Grey is
considered a medium to Large bird and an adequate living space
 must be
provided. Purchase the biggest cage you can, but at least 36" x 36" at minimum.

Average Lifespan:  African Greys, when properly cared for, typically live to be
around age 50. There are, however, individual Greys that live past that age.

Temperament:  African Greys are extremely intelligent birds, a fact which becomes
evident upon observing their behavior. Many grow to be extremely sweet and
affectionate toward their owners and are known for being rather socialable. A
bored or neglected African Grey will not be a very happy bird, and they will not
hesitate to air their grievances - given the opportunity.
3 WEEK OLD AFRICAN
CONGO GREY
4 WEEK OLD AFRICAN
CONGO GREY
5 WEEK OLD AFRICAN
CONGO GREY
6 WEEK OLD AFRICAN
CONGO GREY
7 WEEK OLD AFRICAN
CONGO GREY
8 WEEK OLD AFRICAN
CONGO GREY
9 WEEK OLD AFRICAN
CONGO GREY
I DO NOT HAVE ANY MORE AFRICAN GREYS!
MINE ARE ALL RETIRED FROM BREEDING AS THEY ARE UP IN AGE!
I ONLY HAVE ONE PET GREY NAMED HANNAH - IN PHOTO ABOVE!
i WILL NOT HAVE ANY MORE BABY GREYS UNLESS I ACQUIRE
ANOTHER YOUNG UNRELATED PAIR FOR BREEDING!
IF YOU ARE A BREEDER OF CONGO GREYS, AND CAN SET ME UP WITH
AN UNRELATED PAIR, PLEASE CONTACT ME AT FEATHER FOCUS.
ENJOY!  THESE ARE BABIES
FROM PREVIOUS CLUTCHES
AT FEATHER FOCUS